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Track Light Interview #5—> Sirock (Mexico)

The “Track Light” series serves to briefly introduce a number of individuals involved
with the One World Artist Gallery (OWAG) from their various places around the globe.

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Today, I talk with Mexican street painter Angel Huerta Flores (Sirock).

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John: Hey, Angel! So first, tell us how you took the name “Sirock”.

Angel: Sirock was a nickname first created when I first started making graffiti six years ago. Over the years it’s evolved a bit.

 

John: Now, apart from your street painting, you’re actually a scientist, aren’t you?

Angel: Yes, I’m also an engineer in Biotechnology. I’m very passionate about science and technology and I like to read scientific articles about current events when I have free time.

John: So, how has your painting style developed since you really began with it in earnest six years ago?

Angel: At the beginning I leaned more towards graffiti since I was in an group of friends that were all graffiti artists, but little by little I learned more forms of expression. Out of that exploration came my interest in caricature and illustration.

A mural painted by Sirock at Balcones de Santa Anita, Tlajomulco de Zúñiga, Mexico.

John: Do you remember the first wall you painted?

Angel: Yes, it was near my house. I made it in the morning before going to high school… it was just some graffiti using my name Sirock.

John: Did you get formal art training from school or somewhere else?

Angel: My art techniques are mostly self-taught. Sometimes I attended a workshop where I could learn approaches to to making murals, but for the most part I’ve just learned by doing.

a wall mural painted by Sirock in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.

John: And which artists have influenced you the most in your own work?

Angel: There were several artists who inspired me to lean towards caricature during that time of development. Some of them were locals from Guadalajara (where I live), while others were national and international artists. Some of the most influential to me are Smithe from Mexico City, as well as GR170 from Spain and Bué The Warrior from Belgium.

Wall mural by GR170 “We are 99%” in Gdynia, Poland.

 

Wall mural by Bué the Warrior in Ghent, Belgium.

John: Yeah… I can see that connection stylistically especially in the last two. I think there’s something in that vintage/retro cartoon style from the 1950s that has a playful, joyous vibe to it in your work as well as theirs.

Do you think a more playful approach to drawing (such as cartoons and caricature) can sometimes communicate better than a very serious or realistic approach?

A wall mural painted by Sirock in Tlajomulco de Zúñiga, Mexico.

Angel: Yeah, I think that cartoons will always be a good way of communicating information to the public since they can be understood in an instant by anyone.

John: Recently you painted a wall mural in Tlajomulco de Zúñiga, during the time of an election. Unfortunately it was painted over for a political ad. That was just a coincidence, right? Is any of your work political in nature?

A mural by Sirock is painted over by a political ad.

Angel: Yes, that was just a coincidence. There wasn’t enough space on the wall for both! My work rarely talks about politics. My work is more focused on joy, good times, and culture.

John: And what about sports… How do you feel Mexico did in this World Cup?

Angel: Well, I didn’t expect much from Mexico… we are better at other sports like basketball!

John: At least you made it to the cup this year! So, how can someone get in contact with you?

Angel: My official Facebook page is a good place to see my work and contact me.


(Bue The Warrior by Jurriaan Persyn is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0, from Wikimedia Commons)

(Gdynia – mural “We Are 99%” by GR170 by Andrzej Otrębski is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0, from Wikimedia Commons)

 

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Track Light Interview #2—> El Mordi (Mexico)

The “Track Light” series serves to briefly introduce a number of individuals involved
with the One World Artist Gallery (OWAG) from their various places around the globe.

<- – – – – 

Today, I talk with illustrator and designer Jaime García (El Mordi).

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John: Hey Jaime, what’s up? I really dig the DrawBag you recently did.

Jaime: Thanks, John. It was a pleasure to collaborate with you.

John: As you know, the artists involved in the OWAG project are from all over the world. Can you tell us more about the design you drew?

Jaime: My illustration is basically a modern representation of a character from Mexican culture known as La Catrina, which represents death during El Día de Muertos (the Day of the Dead).

John: Now, you go by the name El Mordi, which is different than your birth name. How did that come about?

Jaime: It’s actually a cheesy story. My ex-girlfriend started calling me that after a phone call in which I was eating a sandwich. She asked what I was doing and I offered her a bite by using the first two syllables of the word “bite in Spanish which is “mordida. She thought it was funny for me to say “mordi,” and started calling me Mordi. Shortly after that we started calling each other by the name and I created a couple of characters which represented the two of us: “Mordi & Mordi”. From that moment on I started signing my artwork under this name.

Self-portrait by Jaime Garcia (El Mordi).

John: What were your first memories of art-making?

Jaime: I started drawing at a young age. One of my first teachers was my older brother. I remember drawing by his side… as a matter of fact, at the beginning I just used to copy his drawings. And I’ve been connected to that early way of expressing myself ever since.

John: That’s funny, I had the same experience with my older brother. And were there any working artists or illustrators that influenced you in your development over time?

Jaime: I like the work of contemporary artists such as Mark Ryden, James Jean, Alex Ross, Sachin Teng, just to name a few… because honestly, I really like a lot of artists.

John: I would say there’s a bit of tension in our world right now…

Jaime: Yes… I agree.

John: Are there any artists who are interacting with those tensions in a way that inspires you?

Jaime: There’s a lot of chaos in the world right now. I like to use creativity as a way to criticize political and moral aspects of society, and so Banksy’s work is an inspiration to me in that way.

John: What form is your own artwork taking these days?

Jaime: I’m currently freelancing with my art and before that I was fully into web design. But now as a freelancer I have been focusing on children’s illustrations. I like the world of children’s tales a lot.

John: And what about when you aren’t drawing..?

Jaime: I like watching movies, playing video games, and hanging out with my friends. The truth is I’m pretty ordinary in my interests. But what I enjoy the most by far is drawing and getting inspired by the artists I follow!

You can see more of El Mordi’s work on his website or follow him on Instagram.